Latest Blog Posts

21 November 2014

Posted by in Latest Blog Posts on Nov 21, 2014 .
Oranges come into their own during the midst of our winter here in the UK. They are a main ingredient in two of our favourite cake recipes: navel oranges are used in the first and, unusually, boiled clementines in the second. 

The clementine cake was a new addition to the menu on breadmaking courses last winter and it’s a big hit, so here to stay. One for the gluten-free repertoire - and dairy-free if you don’t grease the tin with butter. 

I’ve included the zucchini loaf because courgettes are still appearing in veg boxes and local...

26 May 2014

Posted by in Latest Blog Posts on May 26, 2014 .

 a clarification from Andrew Whitley
 

On May 14th the Times Scotland reported (paywall) the launch of my new book DO SOURDOUGH – Slow bread for busy lives. In my talk at the launch at Edinburgh's Fruitmarket Gallery on May 7th, I had listed some of the many benefits of bread made with long fermentation and the active functioning of lactic acid bacteria – sourdough, for short. I mentioned studies showing how the gluten proteins that trigger conditions such as coeliac disease can be broken down by sourdough fermentation.

I also...

10 February 2014

Posted by in Latest Blog Posts on Feb 10, 2014 .
10/2/14

But at this time of year they are pretty important. This is the marmalade-making season, when Seville oranges are briefly available and at their best. 

I use a recipe from Jocasta Innes ‘The Country Kitchen’ (Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1979), which explains the various ways of preparing the thick, hard skin of oranges and establishes the principle of cooking everything slowly until the sugar goes in and quickly afterwards.

 

Innes also tells us how a preserve of oranges came to be created in the town of Dundee in the...

10 February 2014

Posted by in Latest Blog Posts on Feb 10, 2014 .

Six bread-making enthusiasts, all with a wish to bring the benefits of slowly-fermented, healthy, artisan bread to their fellow citizens, came together for four days to bake, to develop their knowledge and skills and to ferment their good ideas.

Before the course, everyone had told us something of their plans, their breadmaking experience and what they most wanted to focus on. 

Day one started at 10am and by 11am everyone had their hands in a wet and sticky sponge-and-dough that would become ciabatta, focaccia and rolls as well as...

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